Identifying a TBI: A Teacher's Role

Many schoolteachers are the first to notice that something may be wrong with one of their students, because Monday morning when that student athlete comes into homeroom or first-period English, he or she may be showing some signs and symptoms that was not apparent the day of the game or even to the parents for the rest of the weekend. Sensitivity to light, complaint that the headache hasn't gone away, possible irritability or inability to read something on the blackboard or understand something that the teacher has asked them to do. And so for the classroom teacher who may not be coaching in the school or even attending those sporting events to see one of their students possibly hurt on the field, this is important information. They are now part of the group taking care of these young people and seeking to identify what might be wrong.

Teachers are often the first to notice that something may be wrong with a student from a hit during sports.

Marlena Wald

Marlena M. Wald, MPH, MLS is an epidemiologist in the Division of Injury Response in the National Center for Injury Control and Prevention (NCIPC). Her areas of research include acute care, traumatic brain injury, and substance issues related to both of these topics.

Posted on BrainLine May 5, 2011.

Produced by Vicky Youcha and Ashley Gilleland, BrainLine.