TBI 101: Physical Symptoms

BrainLine
Physical Symptoms After Head Injuries

The human brain manages much more than just thoughts. It coordinates our physical movements and subconscious responses, from the push of leg muscles to simple breathing. It’s busy regulating our blood pressure, directing our digestive system, shifting our hormonal balance, and even maintaining our body temperature. The brain oversees our actions and reactions. When a brain injury occurs, it can disrupt any of our regular functions and create a tremendous amount of confusion and difficulty. And in cases of serious traumatic brain injury, the physical symptoms can persist.

What are some of the immediate physical symptoms of brain injury?

When a brain injury does occur, there are some physical symptoms that can point to the need for immediate medical attention.

If you've witnessed someone experience a blow to the head, it's important to keep an eye out for several key physical indicators of brain injury:

After a significant brain injury, physical symptoms can change and persist over time. They can affect almost any area of the body. After a moderate or severe injury, symptoms can include:

In addition to a number of other physical symptoms of brain injury, there are also many thinking and cognitive symptoms of TBI .

Responding to a brain injury
Signs and symptoms of brain injury are not always obvious, so the safest bet is to get professional medical help any time a brain injury is suspected.

Posted on BrainLine June 21, 2017.

Comments (2)

As a teenager I was involved in a bike accident with a car and I was knocked out For 40 minutes after suffering a serious concussion (TBI). I woke up in a Hospital bed. I was young and naïve as to the long-term effects of a concussion And had to learn to live with and accept some of the effects physically, Emotionally and psychologically it had on me over the coming weeks and months. These are some of them:

  • Flashbacks to the moment in the accident just before impact with the car. Very Disconcerting.
  • Near Fainting Spells, one of which was just 2 hours after waking up in hospital after being knocked out in the accident. I nearly passed out
  • Dizzy Spells where sometimes the room spins and I lose my balance, Sometimes falling backward.
  • Headaches that sometimes feel as if I have been hit over the head with a sharp hammer and these last only a short time or a dull blunt headache that may last a while and require medication.
  • Sensitivity to light and sound
  • Blurry vision
  • Feeling something was going to hit me even if it wasn’t (caused by nervousness about the accident)
  • Fear of another concussion if I had a fall
  • Loss of concentration
  • Difficulty in learning and retaining information at work
  • Forgetfulness (leaving my mobile phone somewhere and forgetting where and this happened just recently having to buy a new one to replace it)
  • Tiredness
  • Feeling in a fog with no visibility of a better future.
  • Not wanting to go out and socialise.
  • Depression
  • Anxiety.

Most of these faded away over the coming weeks and months after the accident. Adjusting to normal life again took time and was difficult and rebuilding your confidence again after a serious accident is never going to be easy.

I fell from a standing position, backwards and hit an end table at the base of my skull. I didn't get knocked out but I had severe pain in the bridge not my nose and back of head. I was I in a altered state for 3 days or more. It took me 2 months to be able to get anything done. I am still hurting from this..13 years later I am still in alot of pain...base of my neck swells all the time..