Using Technology as a Learning Tool for Kids with Brain Injury

[Nicole Wight] My goals for him academically for elementary, I would like to see him reading better. It's been hard to be really consistent with that at home. I have to be a little harder on myself because I'm like I want him to just relax and take a load off, but he's got to do work when he comes home. Sometimes I'll be like, "All right, you don't have to read tonight. We're going to read tomorrow." But that's inhibiting his progress. I would like to see him reading better. Writing, I'm happy with where that's at. I think he could do it, but I'm never going to push that as much as I'm going to push the typing. I would really like to see him continue to do a lot of work on the computer and using special technology because I think that that's where we're headed as a society, so why not have my kid do the same thing? He's very good at it. He picks it up very easily. I think in the long run it's just going to help him even more. I think he loves technology just because he's a little preteen boy. They love computers and video games and stuff like that, and that's just what he loves to do. He has an iPad. He's on that all the time. He's better at using it than I'm am using mine. My father got him a TouchSmart computer for Christmas, and he's very good with that. He figures it out. He knows—the first thing that I taught him. I know one word he definitely knows how to read is free apps, so he'll read that, and he'll buy some free apps and download those on his computer that he'll play— does his spelling work on there which is incredible. It's got all sorts of math programs and money programs, and he does his Raz-Kids reading which I love because that's how kind of how we can be continuing what he's doing in school at home. His teacher, Ms. McGee, has a website that she uses with him where he does his reading. It will read to him, and then he can read it along with the book, and then he can read it on his own. It was very exciting to have him be able to do that at home independently on his computer and do it really well. The technology is phenomenal. He's so good at it, and I think it's only going to get better for him.

Nicole Wight says using an iPad and a TouchStart computer has helped her son with severe brain injury make significant strides in his learning.

View more videos with Nicole Wight.

Posted on BrainLine November 15, 2013

Produced by Christian Lindstrom, Justin Rhodes, and Amy Joseph, BrainLine.

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