The Desire to Stay in the Game

[Briana Scurry] Concussion is hard to deal with, because as an athlete, you do want to stay in the game—you want to shake it off. When you're getting the opportunity to play—and you're passionate about what you're doing— so you want to continue doing it. It's a hard injury to even know for sure how bad it is. For example, if you break your leg—that's that, right? Or if you blow out your ankle, you know that—that's that. And everybody can see it, and everybody knows there's an injury in that part of your body. With a concussion— you—it's there, but you look fine, right? And you feel like your perception of the world is off. And it's hard to—as a person who suffers from a concussion— it's hard to explain what that feels like to someone else. And of course, you want to stay in the game— and you want to continue to play—nobody wants to be hurt. But, sometimes people make you feel— well, just shake it off—just—just go out there and get over it, and get through it and whatnot—but they wouldn't say that to somebody who has a broken ankle, because there's a certain protocol for broken ankles; there's a certain protocol for blown-out knees, shoulders, whatever. There's not necessarily anything with concussion other than— go over there, sit in a dark room, and I'll be back with you in a few days. That's the protocol for concussion, which isn't anything at all, really. And it's frustrating, and it's complicated.

Retired soccer star Briana Scurry talks about how frustrating and complicated it is trying to explain what it feels like to have symptoms from a concussion and why bouncing back is not always an option.

See more video clips with soccer great Briana Scurry.

Briana Scurry

Briana Scurry is widely thought of as one of the world’s best female soccer goalkeepers. After being named starting goalkeeper for the United States women’s national soccer team in 1994, she helped lead the team in two Olympic gold medals (1996 and 2004), a World Cup  championship (1999), and she had 173 international appearances — a record among female soccer players.

Posted on BrainLine January 22, 2014

Produced by Christian Lindstrom, Justin Rhodes, and Victoria Tilney McDonough, BrainLine.

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