What Is the Glasgow Coma Scale?

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What Is the Glasgow Coma Scale?

The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) is the most common scoring system used to describe the level of consciousness in a person following a traumatic brain injury. Basically, it is used to help gauge the severity of an acute brain injury. The test is simple, reliable, and correlates well with outcome following severe brain injury.

The GCS is a reliable and objective way of recording the initial and subsequent level of consciousness in a person after a brain injury. It is used by trained staff at the site of an injury like a car crash or sports injury, for example, and in the emergency department and intensive care units.

The GCS measures the following functions:

Eye Opening (E)

  • 4 = spontaneous
  • 3 = to sound
  • 2 = to pressure
  • 1 = none
  • NT = not testable

Verbal Response (V)

  • 5 = orientated
  • 4 = confused
  • 3 = words, but not coherent
  • 2 = sounds, but no words
  • 1 = none
  • NT = not testable

Motor Response (M)

  • 6 = obeys command
  • 5 = localizing
  • 4 = normal flexion
  • 3 = abnormal flexion
  • 2 = extension
  • 1 = none
  • NT = not testable

Clinicians use this scale to rate the best eye opening response, the best verbal response, and the best motor response an individual makes. The final GCS score or grade is the sum of these numbers.

Using the Glasgow Coma Scale

A patient's Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) should be documented on a coma scale chart. This allows for improvement or deterioration in a patient's condition to be quickly and clearly communicated.

Individual elements, as well as the sum of the score, are important. The individual elements of a patient's GCS can be documented numerically (e.g. E2V4M6) as well as added together to give a total Coma Score (e.g E2V4M6 = 12). For example, a score may be expressed as GCS 12 = E2 V4 M6 at 4:32.

Every brain injury is different, but generally, brain injury is classified as:

  • Severe: GCS 8 or less
  • Moderate: GCS 9-12
  • Mild: GCS 13-15

Mild brain injuries can result in temporary or permanent neurological symptoms and neuroimaging tests such as CT scan or MRI may or may not show evidence of any damage.

Moderate and severe brain injuries often result in long-term impairments in cognition (thinking skills), physical skills, and/or emotional/behavioral functioning.

Limitations of the Glasgow Coma Scale

Factors like drug use, alcohol intoxication, shock, or low blood oxygen can alter a patient’s level of consciousness. These factors could lead to an inaccurate score on the GCS.

Children and the Glasgow Coma Scale

The GCS is usually not used with children, especially those too young to have reliable language skills. The Pediatric Glasgow Coma Scale, or PGCS, a modification of the scale used on adults, is used instead. The PGCS still uses the three tests — eye, verbal, and motor responses — and the three values are considered separately as well as together.

Here is the slightly altered grading scale for the PGCS:

Eye Opening (E)

  • 4 = spontaneous
  • 3 = to voice
  • 2 = to pressure
  • 1 = none
  • NT = not testable

Verbal Response (V)

  • 5 = smiles, oriented to sounds, follows objects, interacts
  • 4 = cries but consolable, inappropriate interactions
  • 3 = inconsistently inconsolable, moaning
  • 2 = inconsolable, agitated
  • 1 = none
  • NT = not testable

Motor Response (M)

  • 6 = moves spontaneously or purposefully
  • 5 = localizing (withdraws from touch)
  • 4 = normal flexion (withdraws to pain)
  • 3 = abnormal flexion (decorticate response)
  • 2 = extension (decerebrate response)
  • 1 = none
  • NT = not testable

Pediatric brain injuries are classified by severity using the same scoring levels as adults, i.e. 8 or lower reflecting the most severe, 9-12 being a moderate injury and 13-15 indicating a mild TBI. As in adults, moderate and severe injuries often result in significant long-term impairments.

Posted on BrainLine February 13, 2018. Reviewed July 25, 2018.

References

Teasdale G, Allen D, Brennan P, McElhinney E, Mackinnon L. The Glasgow Coma Scale: an update after 40 years. Nursing Times 2014; 110: 12-16

Teasdale G, Jennett B. Assessment of coma and impaired consciousness. A practical scale. Lancet 1974,2:81-84. PMID 4136544.

The Glasgow Structured Approach to Assessment of the Glasgow Coma Scale. (n.d.). Retrieved February 13, 2018, from www.glasgowcomascale.org.

Comments (162)

Please remember, we are not able to give medical or legal advice. If you have medical concerns, please consult your doctor. All posted comments are the views and opinions of the poster only.

Reading through these comments bring back so much pain, I just lost my dad to a horrible car accident. He lost control of his vehicle and suffered many injuries, his whole left side of his brain had a stroke, he literally started swelling within 24hrs of his car accident. His GCS score was 3 and writhing the days of him being in the trauma center he was not on any sedation and his score remained a 3. I hate thinking that drs did not do everything in their power to save him. He was so young and it hurts so bad, I guess I just hate knowing that a lot of my family members who I have lost have died in that hospital. I don’t even know what to think! I just can’t come to terms with it, I kept telling the drs on face time. Please do everything you can for him! Remember to you he is just a check, you will have another case today tomm the next but to me that is my dad a brother a grandpa a husband. I guess it was just so hard because through the entire process because of covid we were not allowed to be by his side. We only got one hr one hr before he passed.

Oh, My Lordness...!
May his soul be rest in enternal.

My brother-in-law has a GSC of 5 and has been between a 3-5 for 8 days. He was found unconscious for unknown amount of time with fever of 108. He is in acute renal failure, on a ventilator, no sedation, and still unresponsive. They said his crit level is a 7 and climbing and want to start dialysis. Not sure he will pull thru with a constant GSC of 5 of 8 days. Any feedback? He is a drug addict and did have meth laced with fentanyl in his system.

I was in a bad car wreck going 65mph in a head on collision in Alaska. I didn’t hit my head on anything but I was shaken very badly (only know this because the seat belt locked so tight that it almost cut me in half but wouldve been thrown and died if I wasn’t wearing it). Since I was unconscious, I don’t remember how long I was out for. I lost consciousness and woke up when the first responders got there. If the first responders responded from the station to the crash site, it’s a 20-30 min drive. It’s a 20 min drive to the hospital from the crash site. I lost consciousness at 5 times. They ended up intubating me and putting me on a ventilator. About a week later, I was weaned off of the sedation and had been med evac’d to the continental US. I have migraines on a daily basis and the migraines vary in severity. I have dizziness. I used to have 20/20 vision. When I woke up, I could only see 6 inches in front of my face. I now wear glasses with prescription, prisms due to convergence difficulty, and tint due to light sensitivity. I’m having difficulty reading and believe I might have acquired dyslexia. I used to be intelligent. I graduated at 16 from high school and went to college for pre med. After my wreck, I can’t even do simple math. I have difficulty remembering details and recent things that happened when before I had a photographic memory and could remember everything that I was told once. The MRI doesn’t show anything. I’ve been diagnosed with a mild TBI and neck injury at the Polytrauma at the VA. The new hospital that I’ve been sent to blames my neck injury and tries to say that I don’t have a TBI even though they firs saw me a year after the injury. I believe I have a moderate TBI because it’s been 2 yrs and my symptoms are worsening not getting better. The TBI clinic I’m going to isn’t helping me at all. When I bring in valid questions, I’m told that’s not a thing or you don’t have that without being examined. When I bring in scholarly articles about my valid questions, I’m told “Well I’m not the subject matter expert”. If the PA over my case is not the subject matter expert then why is she working at a physician in the TBI clinic? I’m trying to find a new clinic to go to. I live in San Antonio, TX

I feel you. (Highly intelligent; technical job. now 4 years tbi/concussion survivor with post-concussion syndrome (PCS). )

(My concussion was also classified as mild (because concussions are measured on the Glasgow Coma Scale. ok... so I can talk, open my eyes and move my hand on command; that does in no way mean that what we are going through is mild! )

Good that you are going to find a doctor or other medical professional (vestibular/vision/psychological, etc.) who gets it, even if you still have to keep going to that doctor for insurance purposes or whatever.

Keep up the good work; take care.

Hello, i am medical student year 3 , how we want to assess blind people using glasgow coma scale

The test result should be NT (not testable) and the total score doesn't include eyes assessment

My husband was in a motorcycle accident, he was thrown from his bike he was not helmeted, he had gave his helmet to a passenger. Well he was GCS 3. The severity of his injury was so bad that he had 3 hemorrhages which was non-operable...He was on a ventilator I was told he could not breathe on his own, non reactive to light, pain stimuli, NOTHING. The neurologist advised us that his prognosis was very poor. He had 5CT Scans with no change. He was swelling on day 2, the family decided without me to take him off the ventilator.. they were advised he would not last no more than 30min but he held on for 9hrs BREATHING ON HIS OWN but gave up....I just got his medical records and read through them... he was intoxicated at the time of the accident, which could affect his tests etc. I believe if he lasted 9hrs before he passed, if they only left him on for a week to really see if there would be any changes, but because the swelling was so severe and they could not relieve the swelling the family decided to take him off. I’m more upset I wasn’t involved in that decision. Please have hope, trust your gut instinct because the doctors aren’t always right, they said my husband wouldn’t last 30min without the ventilator but he lasted 9hrs!!! I’m devastated my husband was only 34.

I’m so sorry about your husband I’m here because my child’s father is in icu with an enlarged heart and Covid I just learned that his GCS is also a 3 and I’m trying to keep faith. He’s on a ventilator with continuous dialysis. He had an hemorrhagic stroke as well and some brain bleed. My son is only 8 months and just to imagine that he’ll have to grow up without him hurts me to the core sucks. Keep us in your prayers if you can.

I am sorry for your loss. My 13-year-old cousin is in a deep coma, GCS 3. She is also on a ventilator and has no response to light, pain or anything. Her brain has swollen due to homerrhage and had 2 cardiac arrests in the same day. Doctors said her condition is inoperable and that she may die any minute. We are very devastated and hope that she will wake up one day.

I am a motorcycle rider as well. It makes me so sad to read this. So sorry for your loss! Stay strong!
Greetings from Austria, Wick

So sorry that happened to you Rebecca. My son was hit by a car Dec.2011...severe TBI gsc 3...died twice...2 major seizures...was in a coma for 2 months and when he came out of it he was in a semi vegetative state..no eye contact..no talking...just rocking back and forth and rubbing his head and drooling. Drs said I need to put him in a care home where he can age safely and securely...24 yrs old. We could not accept that. As a family we did every possible thing to help him recover...14 hours a day...constant therapy. Music... touch stimulation...3 brothers holding him upright while I was on the floor moving his feet...I stayed in that province for almost a year. Every time he made a bit of progress the dr would say that was coincidence or that's all he will be able to do. I took over his complete care so he wouldn't be a burden on the nurses as I was scared they were going to xfer him to a care home. Almost one year later Corey walked out of that hospital with the exact same personality he had before ..has every memory from childhood ..makes us laugh every day. He will always have to live with us as the accident left him with short term memory loss and some cognitive impairments so he's on disability but his sight came back after about a year! We also weaned him off all the antipsychotic medications they had him on...terrible stuff!! Everyone out there..have hope and remember that Drs are not Gods!!

Thank you for sharing. I almost died 4 years ago. Slipped and fractured skull, I remember hearing the sound of ocean waves and knew I was dying. I lived alone and remained unconscious for 4 days. I had a tremendous amount of healing to do but the crazy part is, I didn’t tell anyone. I felt as just what you said - the doctors arent god and I was alive by a miracle. I didn’t want to hear fright and doom and took control of my healing. It was incredibly difficult to do but foods and herbs helped. Two years later I went in for mri’s I was still suffering a major concussion. But after I woke I had vomiting, dizziness, hearing problems, eyesight issues. My hair sheds out a lot today and I still have a soft spot where my skull fractured. I have a touch of dyslexia and have a hard time concentrating on reading but I knew I survived by a miracle and am back to myself but actually more improved. I believe something saved me so I could fulfill a purpose.

I hope you will believe me when I say it's best not to dwell on the "what ifs." You'll drive yourself crazy. I worked in an ICU and saw some people recover from horrible injuries, but most did not. If they weren't able to relieve the pressure on his brain, he would have herniated and the results would be the same. I have seen that there are worse things than death, from work and in my own life. My grandfather lived in a miserable state for 20 years after he survived being taken off the ventilator. He had a stroke after a brain aneurysm repair at 58 years old, so he lived with the damage from the stroke for all of that time. He was confined to a wheelchair, then bedridden for the last 3 years of his life. He only knew my grandmother, my mom, and his 3 other children. I felt like I lost my grandfather the day he went into the hospital for the aneurysm repair. My sister was flown by helicopter after being found unresponsive in her recliner at home. She had been there for 3 days. We still don't know what happened, I have suspicions about her odd neighbors since she had some trauma to her head on both sides, not something that would happen if she had fallen before sitting in her recliner. Her MRI was terrible. She had suffered a stroke or lack of oxygen to her brain, or both, they weren't sure, she was only 46 years old. Her brain was swelling, and she didn't respond to anything. I noticed she began to posture, which indicates severe brain damage. I knew that even if she survived and could breathe on her own, she would be in a vegetative state. We decided to take her off of the ventilator. It was 13 hours before she finally passed. I feel we made the right decision, but I wish I knew what had happened to her. I don't know why you weren't the one making the decisions since the spouse is the next of kin and I don't like it when physicians tell people that the person will pass away quickly, it's unrealistic to predict such things. More often than not, it takes longer if the person isn't absolutely brain dead. I'm so sorry for your loss, I hope you can find peace.

Am so sorry about all you being through.. and I hope you find peace. Amen

May god give you strength to overcome your loss. Please look after yourself and may your husband rest in peace

I am so sorry for your loss and will pray for you. God please comfort this wife and help her get through this storm. Amen.

I will keep you in my prayers Rebekah. May you get the strength to overcome this grief. Please take good care of yourself. I am sure that wherever your husband is, he will always want you to take care of yourself and will be watching over you.
Stay safe.

How or why did the hospital let his family override you making that call to have him removed. You are his next of kin as long as you all were married.

My thoughts exactly Lisa. Hope Rebekah finds peace at this time.

My Gcs was a two when I had a grand Mal seizure do to alcohol - Aspirated as well. I survived it. How close was I to dead??

How did you score two, when there are three parts to the test, all with a minimum score of one?
I've just come out of hospital after suffering diabetic hypoglycemia and a seizure, which left me in a coma on my bedroom floor. Paramedics found and saved me. My GCS was 3 and I was very close to death.
I'm not belittling you in any way, just curious.

There is NT ( not testable) below a 1

My father gcs is 4 after surgery before surgery it was 7. is there any chance recovery

There is ALWAYS HOPE...UNTIL THERE'S NOT!!

So Jimmy Sham being GC15 is good and bad. Damn permanent neurological damage, I hope not.

Examination if GCS is 115/15 you are Okey everything it's fine

To all the Doctors, nurses and anybody whatsoever connected with hospitals and the emergency services. For all of us you are our heroes because we all need you throughout life.

Thank you!

thank you....... God bless you

My grandmother gcs level is 3 is there is any chance for her to be normal?

That's pretty low, prognosis isn't good. Even an MD might say that. It all depends on the reason the GCS is so low...Stroke? Sepsis? No one can say much without the complete clinical picture. D. Gonzales RN

I'm a clear glass glow abnormal scale human diamond the general daughter

Hello! I don't know the extent of her injuries but, I was in a car accident almost 4 years ago and I believe my GCS score was 3-5, I was in a coma for 10 days and had paralysis on the right side of my body. Physically I have fully recovered, I had to relearn how to walk so I still have a very slight limp. However during my recent research of TBIs I have come to learn that TBIs start as acute (when they first happen) and turn into chronic TBIs (over time it becomes worse neurologically) as it turns into a chronic TBI, the psychological effects of the injury become worse due to the effect it has on the brains neurotransmitters. As far as I put together (I'm no doctor) my injury has effect on my serotonin, dopamine, and acetylcholine levels (probably effect other neurotransmitters, I have only researched these so far) and the TBI causes a deficit in these neurotransmitters. These deficits have caused a lack of motivation, sleeping all the time, memory, attention, learning and processing speeds, these are typical signs of depression, I am not sad, just experiencing symptoms of depression do to my brain injury affecting my neurotransmitters. From my research a SSRI and dopamine agonists/DARI (dopamine reuptake inhibitors) will help reduce these affects. I have yet to go to a psychologists to get these drugs. Do some research of how TBIs affect the neurotransmitters! She might not need them now but in a few years he might, definitely tell her or care giver to mention this to doctors, I waited 4 years to get help and my condition has only gotten worse, I can barely pass basic college classes now, with this information in her doctors hands can improve his doctors life! I've also read that Deep brain stimulation (DBS) can bring people out of vegetative states

Friend was A Glasgow 3, now Orthopedic surgeon.

From what I am reading, the **INITIAL** GCS Score has nothing to do with the chance of survival or quality of life. It is should be used only as a diagnosis tool that can show improvement or deterioration. Do I understand this correctly?

My friend, 23 years old, suffered a road traffic accident on 24 july 2019 (3 days ago).
His GCS is 6.
What are his chances of recovery?

It depends on various factors
Mri reports
Is he conscious or not
First 48-72 hrs are always critical in these kind of cases
If he shows progress in one or 2 days chances are he will recover

Hello! I don't know the extent of your friends injuries but, I was in a car accident almost 4 years ago and I believe my GCS score was 3-5, I was in a coma for 10 days and had paralysis on the right side of my body. Physically I have fully recovered, I had to relearn how to walk so I still have a very slight limp. However during my recent research of TBIs I have come to learn that TBIs start as acute (when they first happen) and turn into chronic TBIs (over time it becomes worse neurologically) as it turns into a chronic TBI, the psychological effects of the injury become worse due to the effect it has on the brains neurotransmitters. As far as I put together (I'm no doctor) my injury has effect on my serotonin, dopamine, and acetylcholine levels (probably effect other neurotransmitters, I have only researched these so far) and the TBI causes a deficit in these neurotransmitters. These deficits have caused a lack of motivation, sleeping all the time, memory, attention, learning and processing speeds, these are typical signs of depression, I am not sad, just experiencing symptoms of depression do to my brain injury affecting my neurotransmitters. From my research a SSRI and dopamine agonists/DARI (dopamine will help reduce these affects. I have yet to go to a psychologists to get these drugs. Do some research of how TBIs affect the neurotransmitters! Your friend might not need them now but in a few years he might, definitely tell your friend or his care giver to mention this to his doctors, I waited 4 years to get help and my condition has only gotten worse, I can barely pass basic college classes now, with this information in his doctors hands can improve his doctors life!

My friend's GCS is 3. And he is on ventilator. Doctors are saying that now they can't do anything. Only miracle can do. And if any miracle will happen even then also the patient will not be able to live his life outside the bed. Can any doctor here please suggest the next steps. To me or Doctors at the hospital. Thanks in Advance

My niece is in the same situation they have told us the same thing. Today makes 10 days in her coma shes showing no change shes still a 3.
What happened with your friend??

Hi. I am sorry for hearing that. The fact is we can not predict how a patient is going to evaluate. The GSC is just one of the parameters that us, doctors, use to have a better big picture of the patient’s general state. It will depend on what has caused it. The first 48 hours of evolution and so on. Actually GSC 3 is the minimal, so usually the prognosis is what we call “reserved”. I can’t not give any medical advice, just general information. There are a lot of more information that a doctor might know before giving a proper opinion. Wishing you the best. Claire

I'm Brian and I'm a survivor of a very serious football injury that left me in a coma for 5 weeks. I was a coma scale 3 myself!! I had a one percent chance of surviving myself! I have made a miraculous recovery but lost half of my vision and was parilized on my right side because I did suffer a stroke while I was in my coma. I had many years of intense therapies and my family has sacrificed so much for me! It's been very difficult but accepting new normal has been a very big challenge!! I hope ur friend has a good quality of life like I do!! I'm very lucky

When my daughter was 2 and a half, she drowned in a family pool. I found her, got her out and started CPR, while yelling for my grandpa to call 911. She was clinically dead. It was November and the water cold. Finally am heard and EMS called. I was only trained in basic CPR. I hadn't been taught this, but something told me to press on her belly and get the water out. I did and a lot of water came out, then I started CPR. I was doing it for maybe 7 minutes. In between a breath, I said," Breath Tracy breath". I swear right after I said that she started breathing, but it was erratic and sporadic. EMS arrived right after and took over. When I arrived at the hospital, I was told that she probably won't survive and even if she did, to tell my family that she wouldn't be the same little girl. I was asked if I wanted to donate her organs. I screamed at them that they're not cutting my baby. I prayed and called everyone I knew and asked them to do the same. In less than 24 hours, she walked out of the hospital, as if nothing happened. Now she's 20 years old and attending college. If, you didn't believe in miracles, you should now. My daughter is a miracle.

God bless your daughter and your family

This is so heartwarming to hear. Extending hope to other survivors and their care givers. I myself am a Doctor. Accidentally happened to browse through this site, in an attempt to share info to the father of a girl child patient with Acute TBI who is battling her odds in the hospital today, day 11.
On the bright side, the baby 7/F who was comatose with multiple intra-cerebral bleeds and fractured skull bones after a fall from terrace top. Baseline GCS was 3. has been successfully weaned off the ventilator on day 4. Now she has been shifted to the general ward. GCS improved to 9 with eye opening and movements. Tracheostomy (opening made in neckline for breathing) is helping spontaneous breathing. Motor functions and verbal response yet to recover. Likely to be discharged home over next 5 days.

Just pray that she doesn't land up with sequelae of diffuse axonal injury, given the better healing in kids.

For all the caregivers out there, do believe in your loved ones' spirit to fight the crisis and the supernatural support to heal. Miracles do happen!

What an amazing story. God bless you and your daughter.

Good for you, that's what it comes down to in the end. Cold, dispassionate and sterile scientists, and some doctors who like to 'play god', versus actual god. Why do people take everything they say seriously anyway? Medical treatment has its place for sure, but its practitioners, particularly doctors and surgeons, don't need to be glorified and pandered to in the way they currently are. To see everything in purely mechanical, materialistic and physical terms is a disease in itself, a spiritual sickness. Good for you Rachelle; your faith saved your daughter and confounded the medics. I hope you and your daughter both live to see the future world.

Omg!! Rachelle I dont even know how I came upon this page...reading your story I was mortified all til the end, wow my heart was breaking for you, then I read where you say after praying, she began breathing !! Is God trying to tell me something ? My husband is currently in the hospital in a mental state of impairment due to passing out and staying unconscious for about 5 days until a well check was made by the local police only to find him almost dead. We are praying for a full mental recovery so he can be a part of our 9 yr old sons life!

Thank you for sharing your needs and I too happened onto this page, as I am recovering from a second TBI from precious, but careless distracted drivers. ❤️ I pray for them a lot. I’d like to apologize for typos as I’m experiencing a slight seizure as I write this, but felt compelled to do so.

Anyway I have experienced many miracles as we have a ministry specifically for the Deployed military members, and I have an Army soldier son of my own. He has been saved from death many times, and yet we have seen many who have fought just as hard and don’t always come home... but God sees the end, which is the Beginning. He sees what our hearts can fathom in such painful, tough situations, whether accidents, illnesses or war.

I’m praying wholeness and healing for those mentioned and you wonderful responders who made comments. I once was requested to go to Cedars-Mt.Sinai, on my way to visit my near to be son-in-law who had been so badly attacked he had Last Rites twice. On my way, I got a call (I’m a non-denominal minister) to pray for a little girl who drowned in my friend’s pool states away. She was in a vegetative state and in full convulsions 24/7. I remember nurses weren’t happy with me when I asked to see her, per her parents request. They just wanted others to let her die peacefully, and felt we were nuts quite frankly. I went into room, tried not to let her string convulsions dampen my faith and prayed. Nothing happened that I could see change. I told the Lord it is up to Him and I’d stand. Nothing happened until hours later that night. I traveled a lot and My friend did not let me know till much later that after I left Elisha suddenly awoke! Fully healed and yes, a miracle. My soon to be son in law was hooked up to countless machines in a catholic Tarzana hospital when I arrived, near LA. Half his head was crushed. Swollen to where I could not tell who he was. Drs said No Hope. I asked his mom in my first level Spanish to come sit by me as I prayed. And prayed. For three days. On the third day I laid my hand beside his, not on it and felt I was to call his name and ask him to squeeze my hand on his own if he could. Immediately to our shock, he grabbed my hand hard and I still have the picture! He slowly improved to a fairly independent state, though not quite the same. It turned out to be as God saw fit, as He sees the whole picture. We never do. I speak hope to you for the impossible. Wisdom for the choices you must make. God’s presence to surround and draw each of you so close you feel it in your heart. I’ve been around for a long time. I’ve seen soldiers and all Kinds of diverse folks seeming fine one moment and when all alone, take their own lives. And I’ve heard military and non-military families were told fellow ministers had left scenes and preached sermons to them Saying their child was in hell. Mortal sin. I do not believe that is scriptural nor do I see such a limited God that He doesn’t hear our last cries. Even if silent. He alone knows the hearts of those who could not hold on. I expect to see them in heaven someday at least I’m praying each one will be!

But for all of us still on this side of the “veil”, battered, depressed or feeling our lives don’t mean much in our condition, we are still here, so we must fight...and when we can’t, we must ask those we love and most of all our God, By His Spirit, to hold our hand through the hard journey whether loved ones live or pass on. But one more word. Talk to them. They often hear everything. Don't just “kick it” yakking or speaking bad outcomes. They “hear.” Speak life until the Master lets their work continue or He sees fit to bring them home. God bless each of you! HOOAH! I’m sorry I was so wordy. I’ll blame it on the rants that comes with TBI’S.
LW.

It's very good to hear tht ur daughter is fyn.
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