What Is Complementary, Alternative, and Integrative Health?

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health
What Is CAM?

Complementary Versus Alternative

Many Americans—more than 30 percent of adults and about 12 percent of children—use health care approaches developed outside of mainstream Western, or conventional, medicine. When describing these approaches, people often use “alternative” and “complementary” interchangeably, but the two terms refer to different concepts:

  • If a non-mainstream practice is used together with conventional medicine, it’s considered “complementary.”
  • If a non-mainstream practice is used in place of conventional medicine, it’s considered “alternative.”

True alternative medicine is uncommon. Most people who use non-mainstream approaches use them along with conventional treatments.

Integrative Medicine

There are many definitions of “integrative” health care, but all involve bringing conventional and complementary approaches together in a coordinated way. The use of integrative approaches to health and wellness has grown within care settings across the United States. Researchers are currently exploring the potential benefits of integrative health in a variety of situations, including pain management for military personnel and veterans, relief of symptoms in cancer patients and survivors, and programs to promote healthy behaviors.

Complementary Or Integrative?

The National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NICCIH) generally uses the term “complementary health approaches” when discussing practices and products of non-mainstream origin. NICCIH use “integrative health” when talking about incorporating complementary approaches into mainstream health care.


Types of Complementary Health Approaches

Most complementary health approaches fall into one of two subgroups—natural products or mind and body practices.

Natural Products

This group includes a variety of products, such as herbs (also known as botanicals), vitamins and minerals, and probiotics. They are widely marketed, readily available to consumers, and often sold as dietary supplements.

According to the 2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), which included a comprehensive survey on the use of complementary health approaches by Americans, 17.7 percent of American adults had used a dietary supplement other than vitamins and minerals in the past year. These products were the most popular complementary health approach in the survey. (See chart.) The most commonly used natural product was fish oil.

Ten most common complementary health approaches among adults:

Ten most common complementary health approaches among adults - 2012. Follow the text version link immediately after this image for details.

Researchers have done large, rigorous studies on a few natural products, but the results often showed that the products didn’t work. Research on others is in progress. While there are indications that some may be helpful, more needs to be learned about the effects of these products in the human body and about their safety and potential interactions with medicines and other natural products.

Mind and Body Practices

Mind and body practices include a large and diverse group of procedures or techniques administered or taught by a trained practitioner or teacher. The 2012 NHIS showed that yoga, chiropractic and osteopathic manipulation, meditation, and massage therapy are among the most popular mind and body practices used by adults. The popularity of yoga has grown dramatically in recent years, with almost twice as many U.S. adults practicing yoga in 2012 as in 2002.

Other mind and body practices include acupuncture, relaxation techniques (such as breathing exercises, guided imagery, and progressive muscle relaxation), tai chi, qi gong, healing touch, hypnotherapy, and movement therapies (such as Feldenkrais method, Alexander technique, Pilates, Rolfing Structural Integration, and Trager psychophysical integration).

The amount of research on mind and body approaches varies widely depending on the practice. For example, researchers have done many studies on acupuncture, yoga, spinal manipulation, and meditation, but there have been fewer studies on some other practices.

Other Complementary Health Approaches

The two broad areas discussed above—natural products and mind and body practices—capture most complementary health approaches. However, some approaches may not neatly fit into either of these groups—for example, the practices of traditional healers, Ayurvedic medicine, traditional Chinese medicine, homeopathy, and naturopathy.


About NCCIH

NCCIH is the Federal Government’s lead agency for scientific research on complementary and integrative health approaches.

The mission of NCCIH is to define, through rigorous scientific investigation, the usefulness and safety of complementary and integrative health interventions and their roles in improving health and health care.

NCCIH’s vision is that scientific evidence will inform decisionmaking by the public, by health care professionals, and by health policymakers regarding the use and integration of complementary and integrative health approaches.

To learn more, visit the NCCIH Facts-at-a-Glance and Mission page.

For More Information

NICCIH Strategic Plan

NCCIH’s current strategic plan, >2016 Strategic Plan: Exploring the Science of Complementary and Integrative Health, presents a series of goals and objectives to guide us in determining priorities for future research on complementary health approaches. The scientific objectives in the plan are aligned with those of the broader National Institutes of Health strategic plan.

NICCIH Clearinghouse

The NCCIH Clearinghouse provides information on NCCIH and complementary and integrative health approaches, including publications and searches of Federal databases of scientific and medical literature. The Clearinghouse does not provide medical advice, treatment recommendations, or referrals to practitioners.

Toll-free in the U.S.:  1-888-644-6226
TTY (for deaf and hard-of-hearing callers): 1-866-464-3615
Web site:  nccih.nih.gov
E-mail:  info@nccih.nih.gov (link sends e-mail)

NCCIH has provided this material for your information. It is not intended to substitute for the medical expertise and advice of your primary health care provider. We encourage you to discuss any decisions about treatment or care with your health care provider. The mention of any product, service, or therapy is not an endorsement by NCCIH. This publication is not copyrighted and is in the public domain. Duplication is encouraged.

Posted on BrainLine June 3, 2016.

From the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. nccih.nih.gov.

Comments (1)

I believe that herbal therapy and medicinal marijuana are alternative therapies. Yet, I don't see those listed here. I know its still taboo to talk about it in some states, but I believe these are important topics to be discussed, especially since pills from pharmaceutical companies can cause seriously dangerous side effects.

Add new comment

CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.