How and Where Can I Meet New Friends or People to Date?

The National Resource Center for Traumatic Brain Injury, Virginia Commonwealth Model Systems of Care
Memory Matters: How and Where Can I Meet New Friends or People to Date?

Finding someone special like a close friend or romantic partner is an important goal shared by most people. Having another person you can trust to discuss your interests, dreams, and goals can add countless joy and meaning to life. Many people find that sharing life with an important person enhances the journey and experience of living.

Unfortunately, many people with traumatic brain injury (TBI) express doubt that they will ever find someone special after their injury.

Have you heard yourself say something like …

  • No-one will ever love or care about me now that I’ve had a brain injury.
  • It’s impossible to meet new people in this town.
  • Who’s going to want to be my friend? I’ve got too many problems.
  • All the people I know are either in a significant relationship or married. There’s no one left to date.
  • I never meet anyone new or interesting. Even if I did, I wouldn’t know how to act or what to say.
  • What’s the use in meeting someone new? All my past relationships have turned out badly.

Like many important tasks, reaching the final goal of having someone special in your life can be broken down into smaller, more manageable steps.

Make a Plan to Meet New People

First, you should make a reasonable plan to meet new people. You’re more likely to be successful at finding a suitable match if you consider your own likes and dislikes, and plan accordingly. If you don’t like heavy metal music, you may not want to plan to meet someone at a rock concert. On the other hand, if you admire books, you may find someone sharing a similar interest at your local library or bookstore. Make a list of things you like to do that offer a chance to meet and talk to others. Remember, pursuing your own interests with a plan to meet others is a great way to make new friends.

Make Yourself Available to Meet Others

Second, you must make yourself available to meet others. That means getting out of your house, apartment, or car and being around new people. Try to do activities you enjoy, in the company

of others, as much as possible. Trying a new activity is another great way to meet other people. If you’ve ever wanted to learn about Chinese cooking or scuba diving, this is a great time to take a group class or lesson. Although some have found meaningful relationships in the newspaper or on-line, quality relationships are usually best formed in person.

Try to be the Kind of Person Someone Else Would Like to Meet

Third, you should try to be the kind of person someone else would like to meet. Think about people you admire and their qualities that attract others to them. What do they look like? How do they act? Do they have a good sense of humor, a caring or giving nature, a cheerful smile, or an interesting story to tell? Which of these attractive qualities do you possess or have the ability to develop?

Keep in mind that every person has something unique to offer others.

Have confidence that you will make someone a great friend.

Posted on BrainLine July 25, 2008.

From the National Resource Center for Traumatic Brain Injury, Virginia Commonwealth Model Systems of Care. Reprinted with permission. www.nrc.pmr.vcu.edu.

Comments (7)

I survived a subarachnoid brain hemorrhage August 15, 2013. I’m really interested in meeting someone and dating again with someone that has survived a similar experience

Yes, but the impediments. First, because I was injured at 7 I've never been able to work. I have just enough money to survive on and at a lower economic class level. If I could afford a car I couldn't drive it. And I have terrible post traumatic stress disorder/social anxiety disorder. I'd hoped getting online, especially on Facebook, would enable me to meet someone. It hasn't happened.

You could form your own Meetup group at Meetup.com. It is very easy to set up. It could be anything you want. For example, you could create a monthly get-together for anyone with similar brain injuries. You could meet at a nearby park or in your home for a movie night or cards. You could make it women-only or men-only, if that makes you more comfortable.

I belong to 2 such groups. One is a monthly board games Meetup and the other is a social Meetup which schedules fun activities several times per week. I have met wonderful friends this way, who live near me.

Or you could offer to bring a neighbor's dog to a nearby dog park every day at the same time. Dogs are an easy conversation starter and people tend to go at the same time every day.

I am learning by getting out of my own way. Isolation comes so easy and I push myself continually to be out. The growth in my spirit is evident. I know my challenges and engage my trust in this life.

My boyfriend has a brain injury from an accident 8 years ago. We have an amazing relationship. Neither of us have ever been happier.

I have TBI seven tears in my cereberal my name is brian malpasso im an artist. I find it hard understanding others enotions, my emotions swing and ruin any chance of meeting anyone not to mention im on a disability budget. I write blogs and theories on theoretical physics and mental disorders, hoping to shed light on those swept under the rug.Meeting people means money isolated and alone for now. At a cross roads sad lonely.

I met a person with a brain injury who is wonderful. For the first time he is happy and I am too.