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Infographic: Leading Causes of Traumatic Brain Injury

Comments [5]

Kelly Deckert, BrainLine

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Leading Causes of Traumatic Brain Injury
Falls
Motor Vehicle & Traffic Incidents
Struck By / Against
Assaults
Other & Unknown
Leading Causes of Traumatic Brain Injury
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Leading Causes of Traumatic Brain Injury

Leading Causes of Traumatic Brain Injury

In the U.S., an estimated 1.7 million people sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) each year.

Leading causes include falls, traffic accidents, assault, and being struck by or against an object — such as another person, a wall, or a falling object. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that there are:

  • 595,095 fall-related TBIs
  • 292,202 motor vehicle/traffic related TBIs
  • 279,882 struck by/against events
  • 169,625 assault-related TBIs
  • 199,447 unknown causes
  • 155,255 injuries classified as “other “

(Source: CDC)
Graphic: © 2015 WETA All Rights Reserved

 

A printable version of this infographic is available here.

Falls

Falls

Falls are the leading cause of traumatic brain injury in the United States. The CDC reports that close to 600,000 —over one third —of brain injuries are the result of falls.  Falls also account for a majority of TBIs among infants, children, and elderly adults.

(Source: CDC)
Graphic: © 2015 WETA All Rights Reserved

Motor Vehicle & Traffic Incidents

Motor Vehicle & Traffic Incidents

Among all age groups, motor vehicle crashes and traffic-related incidents are the second leading cause of TBI. Close to 200,000 brain injuries a year are the result of motor vehicle or traffic accidents, including those involving bicycles and trains. These injuries also result in the largest percentage (32 percent) of TBI related deaths.

 (Source:  CDC)
Graphic: © 2015 WETA All Rights Reserved

 

Struck By / Against

Struck By / Against

At 280,000 brain injuries a year, being struck by or against an object is the third leading cause of TBI in the general population and the second leading cause of TBI in infants and children. These injuries are the result of being unintentionally struck by another person or an object — including falling debris or being struck against an object or person.

 (Source:  CDC)
Graphic: © 2015 WETA All Rights Reserved

Assaults

Assaults

Assaults caused 10 percent of TBIs in the general population. Only 2.9 percent of children between the ages of 0-14 and only 1 percent of adults aged 65 and older were injured in this way.

 (Source:  CDC)
Graphic: © 2015 WETA All Rights Reserved

Other & Unknown

Other & Unknown

Unknown causes make up nearly 200,000 (12 percent) of all TBIs. This category includes all brain injuries in which the emergency department report does not pinpoint the exact cause. (CDC)

Over 155,000 (9 percent) of TBIs are categorized as “other.” “Other” includes any injury that does not fit into another category — such as injuries resulting from electrocution, explosions, fireworks, exposure to radiation, welding flash burn, or animal scratches. (CDC)

Please note that CDC estimates of traumatic brain injury do not include injuries seen at U.S. Department of Defense or U.S. Veterans Health Administration Hospitals. Learn more about military traumatic brain injury and blast injury at Brainline Military.

(Source:  CDC)
Graphic: © 2015 WETA All Rights Reserved

Leading Causes of Traumatic Brain Injury

Leading Causes of Traumatic Brain Injury

Although the Center for Disease Control and Prevention provides data on a wide range of TBIs occurring in this country, it is not currently possible to capture all cases of TBI. There is no estimate for the number of people with non-fatal TBI seen outside of a hospital emergency department or who receive no care at all.

(Source: CDC)
Graphic: © 2015 WETA All Rights Reserved

Comments [5]

9% can be those of us who were in immediate concussive areas of landmines more than once

Aug 9th, 2015 10:04pm

It is like "Murphy's Law", that I fall into the small 9%!

Mar 18th, 2015 10:31am

Maybe you should have read the slide on "struck by". It me means being struck by or against an object.

Mar 1st, 2014 4:27pm

I think they mean just being hit in the head by something, someone or anything.

May 25th, 2013 12:13am

What in the world is a "struck by" TBI? Does it man struck by a car? If so, that is a traffic incident.

Apr 27th, 2013 4:36pm

 

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