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Brain injury Blogs: Voices from People Living with Traumatic Brain Injury

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Katherine Wise, BrainLine

Brain Injury Blogs: Voices of People Living with Traumatic Brain Injury

Groucho Marx got a lot of laughs for saying that he’d never want to be a member of a club that would accept him as a member. For people with brain injury, there isn’t anything funny about their new “membership” into the club of the “invisible injury.” However, many people surprise themselves with their strength, insight, and sense of humor — even in the face of adversity.

The best person to understand what living with a brain injury is like is somebody who has been there him or herself.

Meet these five bloggers who are on their own journeys after brain injury and want to share what they have learned along the way. So, if you are searching for encouragement, advice, or information from an authentic source, take a look at the following blogs and the amazing spirits behind them.

Kara Swanson: Rocking Her Life After Brain Injury

Kara Swanson started her brain injury blog when she realized how much she had learned through writing her book, I’ll Carry the Fork, about her 1996 brain injury.

“I have met thousands of people with brain injury during speeches and online, and I have enjoyed a wonderful new life after my brain injury,” Kara says. “I’ve come a long way from the experience I shared in my book and it has been almost entirely positive. I wanted to shout back to the people coming up behind me and let them know that “up the road the skies are clearing.”

Kara was in a car crash when a driver ran a red light. She still experiences headaches and cognitive fatigue, but has discovered many coping strategies despite her long-term symptoms from brain injury.

“My blog is the written expression of my hopeful attitude toward brain injury recovery and life in general,” Kara says. “While it covers topics that are painful, challenging, and frustrating, it has a bottom line and a consistent message that reflects my very firm belief that we are capable of absolutely rocking our lives after brain injury.”

Her blog targets long-term survivors in the brain injury community. “Because my blog is very positive and conveys a hopeful, grateful message, it usually does not resonate with people most recently injured,” Kara says. “There is a lot of anger and grief that needs to have its time and its voice. That’s important and I get that.”

“I try to target the people who are left, after a year or so, with stubborn symptoms and forever changed lives. The group that’s stuck between what can never be again and what is impossible to conceive,” she says.

While her advice is primarily for people with brain injury, much of it can be applied to the general public. “Brain injury or not, everyone is crippled by something. No one goes through life without change, challenge, and heartbreak,” Kara says. “Everyone will experience something that absolutely rocks his or her world sideways, and those of us with brain injury are fortunate that we have survived to recover from ours.”

Kimberly Carnevale: Butterflies After Brain Injury

Kimberly Carnevale started her blog “Hitting the Road with Brain Injury Riding Shotgun,” when she embarked on an RV trip from New Jersey to Tennessee with her daughter and her service dogs.

Originally, the blog started out as a way for her close friends and family to keep track of where she was and how she was doing as a safety precaution. That way, someone would know if she experienced a “cognitive slip” along the way, one of the lasting symptoms of her brain injury. But as she started to write, more and more people followed her along her journey.

“I had an audience I hadn’t anticipated,” Kimberly says.

Kimberly and her daughter, Sarah, turned their road trip into a campaign to raise awareness about brain injury. She started referring to her blog followers — who were mostly people with brain injury and their families — as her “butterflies,” associating their journey as one similar to emerging from a cocoon.

Their vehicle became known as the Butterfly Express. Kimberly wrote her blog address on the vehicle with window markers. At every truck stop and rest area, she and her daughter put up green paper butterflies, one to represent each of her “butterflies” and distributed pamphlets about brain injury.

“People don’t want to hear about brain injury until it’s happened to them or to someone they love,” Kimberly says.

Kimberly’s brain injury occurred in 1998 when a tractor-trailer rear-ended her car. In that moment, her dream of riding for the US Equestrian team was smashed. With the help of her faith and her first service dog, Dewey, she says she began a new episode of her life.

Kimberly launched an educational program called Canine and Abled to teach the public about service dogs. She now trains problem dogs, and hopes to start an Equine Ability Program to provide therapy using horses.

When Kimberly, Sarah, and the dogs arrived in Tennessee, she considered ending her blog. “I thought it was the end of the road, but people were very upset about it not continuing,” she says. “I felt so supported and loved by them.”

Kimberly’s blog covers many topics, and reflects the thoughts of someone with a brain injury. “It goes all over the place… like us, people with brain injury, we’re all over the place.”

With her strong faith, she says, “I don’t write, I just push the pen. God writes the words.”

Shireen Jeejeebhoy: Deconstructing Misconceptions about Brain Injury

Author Shireen Jeejeebhoy blogs about many different topics. While much of it is based on her books, Lifeliner and She, Shireen has started writing about brain injury, too. She brings her perspective as someone with a mild TBI.

“There is nothing out there for those of us with “mild” injuries who have internal body function problems,” Shireen says.

When Shireen was involved in a car crash in 2000, she did not go to a hospital. She sustained a closed head injury, although she didn’t even find out about it until months after the collision.

“Concussions are only mentioned in the context of the sports world,” she says. “It’s like if you’re concussed from a non-sports cause then you’re not really brain injured and your problems are minor, no big deal.”

Shireen has encountered other misconceptions about people with brain injury as well. “What bothers me most is the fact that medical community insists that no matter how much you heal in the first two years, that’s pretty much as how far you’ll get,” she says. “Not true.”

Shireen says she experienced improvements five to seven years after the four-car crash that caused her injury.

She started her first blog anonymously while going through a lawsuit that involved her crash. “I had relearned to write, and I wanted to put my writing out in public,” Shireen says. “I wanted to practice. And most of all, I was filled with this pent-up emotion that needed an outlet.”

Her second blog began as a way to publicize her book. It was there that she began to write about her brain injury after her lawsuit was over.

“My blog has helped me express my feelings and knowledge about my brain injury treatments and related issues as well as fully process all that’s happened to me,” she says. “It’s also given me a ways to record what I’ve learned so when I forget I can go back and remind myself.”

Shireen says she hopes her writing helps others, too.

“I hope people enjoy what I write, maybe get provoked into thinking about something differently,” she says. “I hope my readers will learn something new about living with brain injury that is helpful to them or at least helps them understand their condition better.”

Mark Kerrigan: Grateful After Brain Injury

Mark Kerrigan’s blog, “Life After Traumatic Brain Injury,” is filled not only with personal stories and advice, but also with information, resources, and videos that he has researched and posted.

Mark sustained a brain injury in 1989, when he went riding on a wet road.

After four weeks in a coma, he had to relearn how to walk and talk. Today, he has made significant progress in his recovery, although he still experiences problems, including a slight limp when he walks and less control over his emotions.

Mark originally started a blog on grammar and punctuation, but was looking for something more. “I did a lot of thinking about what I was passionate about,” Mark recalls.

After realizing that he genuinely wanted to help others, he started his blog about brain injury in June 2009.

“I think it’s therapeutic. It’s a release,” Mark says. “It makes me realize how far I’ve come. It makes me feel very grateful.”

Mark says he posts on his blog often, about five to ten times a month. That way, his readers can consistently count on finding new information on his site.

“I wish there was something out there for my parents and family when I was going through my injury,” he says.

“It may seem like your world’s coming to an end, that it’s upside down, but you can get through it if you have the faith.”

The blog is not only a resource for his readers; Mark finds it helpful for himself as well. “I have trouble expressing myself clearly,” he says. “I can’t always get my thoughts out straight. But since I type, I can always go back and edit.”

Zach Gauvin: Looking Forward After Brain Injury

When Zach Gauvin was 17, doctors told his mother that he had a five percent chance of surviving. He was in a coma for a month after a serious drinking and driving car crash. The doctors said that if Zach did survive, he would be a vegetable.

Zachary, age 22, just graduated from the University of Massachusetts with a bachelors degree in journalism and a minor in political science. He has a book coming out shortly, and has started a blog, “Brain injury Support Group.” He is clearly not a vegetable.

“It wasn’t until after my brain injury that I was interested in writing,” Zach says.

Zach started working on his book, Miracle Kid, in 2008, when he was a sophomore in college. A professor at the University of Massachusetts suggested he start a blog to build a future audience for his book.

“I started to create it and I thought — what do I know that other people don’t know?”

Zach’s blog became much more than a promotional tool for his future book. He began to offer advice and suggestions to other people with brain injury. Soon after it started, his blog had followers worldwide.

“I talked almost every day with a woman in England when I was in college,” Zach says. “Recently, I got an email from a woman in India.”

Zach says that the value of having a blog is the audience that it can reach. “It gives you more access to people,” he says. “The more people I can help, the better.” Zach advises others to persevere.

“You’ve got to just look forward, you can’t look back. Only look back in order to see how far you’ve come.”

Information and Attitude

After their own brain injuries, these five bloggers were seeking information — and a way to express themselves. They began sharing their experiences for others and for themselves; their perseverance and encouragement are contagious. Nobody ever chooses a membership in this club for people with brain injury, but sometimes a club that welcomes you for who you are has bigger-picture benefits.

Visit their blogs and find out for yourself.

Written exclusively for BrainLine by Katherine Wise.

Comments [33]

I had same condition too. I had a very severe accident for 1mnth i was in coma .one thing can save everyone sultan alam sb. Xmannanx@hotmail.com from this Id i am on fb

Aug 30th, 2014 12:39pm

My uncle was at work when a bucket fell off of the roof of a building and struck him on the head. This horrible accident left him with slight brain damage. Though at times he seems just like the same guy as before the accident, there are other times when his struggles are evident. His attorney uncovered that the bucket had been left on the edge of the roof for almost a week with the owners of the building knowingly leaving it up there since it required effort to take it down. With just a little bit of social responsibility my uncle would not have to suffer. 

Aug 12th, 2014 2:55pm

Thank you for sharing your valuable information.this information very useful for online learners

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Jun 4th, 2014 10:26am

i am a student at mosinee i would love to know more about your storys and what it is like living with tbi i am doing a project currently in one of my classes please email me at jpjason@stuudent.mosineeschools.org

May 14th, 2014 3:46pm

My dad suffered a significant tbi 19 months ago; he\'s 76 now. Has anybody come across any information on elderly tbi survivors? Thanks

Oct 14th, 2013 9:54pm

Well, I deal with a similar issue. I have MS, and it offen affects my cognition - memory, reasoning, etc. Although I don't directly have TBI, I have my own version.

Oct 1st, 2013 10:46am

I have been very moved reading your blogs, you are all such courageous people. I want to share something we found out about brain injury after our son committed suicide five years ago. We found that in around a third of brain injuries the pituitary gland is damaged, and this may be responsible for such after-effects as fatigue, depression, infertility, loss of sex drive and obesity. It's treatable with hormone replacement and often leads to dramatic improvement in mood and cognitive function, as well as restored sex drive and fertility, and loss of weight. Please go to www.headinjuryhypo.org.uk for more information because some of you may be helped. http://www.headinjuryhypo.org.uk/html/dr_mark_porter.html gives a good overview. The best of luck!

Sep 30th, 2013 10:50am

Hello my friends. I can see that a lot of people had worse situation then mine. I fell on cement porch, concussion and headache that last. 27 years later still what they called absence. Petit mal. Don't get discourage, keep going and look for expert. You have more strength than you think. Carolyne

Sep 27th, 2013 7:06pm

I have a brain injury and I can relate to the individuals who have posted their story. There was something that stood- out, one individual described a brain injury as: ‘the invisible disability’. This caught my attention because it is true. Lots of people in society still believe to this day that if you cannot see the disability, they do not have one. Although I consider my disability something private and something no one has to know about- sometimes I wish everyone knew for one second so that people can perhaps have another perspective on individuals who have disabilities. We are all different but we are all human. I’ve had to experience this lots in my daily life, some people either talk negative in regards to disabilities or they crack jokes- the minute I tell them ‘I have a brain injury’, they go silent. I can see it in their face- the confusion, due to my high functioning ability to move on with my life and do the things that I wanted before I sustained a brain injury. Lots of the comments in regards to coping skills and rehabilitation seemed quite similar to my life. Everyone deserves a chance and society needs to help with the assistance and guidance if need be.

Sep 17th, 2013 4:08pm

I also have a MTBI, the best thing I found was a Neurologist who works with Brain INjured people. Look for a medical facility in your area that has Neuroresearch,neurosurgery (even though you don't need surgery-they are specialists). Also, not every PT area is the same, some of these people have no idea abut PT and brain injury-we are not the same as other people. Search for a PT who has had education and experience in treating people with a brain injury-this changed my life for the better!

Aug 14th, 2013 4:54pm

I am hoping to find out if there are any drugs on the markrt to help me with my unbalance. my name is Anthony and I had a pontine bleed may 25thg 2010 I have since regained most of my motor functions except for the fact that wwhen I walk it is like walking in a boat I am constantly bumping into things and I cannot even walk a straight line to get my pants on standing on one leg is impossible I need to sit or lean on a wall to get dressed if anyone has any information that will help me please email me at amgelectrician@yahoo.com thank you so very much

Aug 9th, 2013 10:53am

My name is Elise and I sustained a coma due to a heart arrhythmia that caused me to pass out while visiting my grandson at his elementary school. I apparently fell on the asphalt and my daughter took me to the hospital because I kept asking the same series of questions over and over. In my mind I went back to what was going on in my life 2 years previously to that day when I fell. I don't remember the 8 hours of that day and still don't remember that day very well. They sent me home when I finally came back to myself later on that day. However,I am not the same person since then. I still have a hard time remembering things I use to know and I still repeat myself. At first it was really hard for my family and friends not to get upset with me, after awhile it is hard not to get frustrated with the different person who emerges after the concussion. I have always had a strong belief in God, and he has made me physically better and emotionally stronger since the concussion, which happened ten years ago now. I appreciate this blog, because there are still days that are difficult. All I can say is, that I agree with someone who said in their blog, don\\\\\\\'t look back at who you were, be grateful for the strength and courage it took you to survive and even flourish today. There will always be people who don\\\\\\\'t understand and be critical of something you said or didn't say, or something you didn't remember. We, as survivors can't let anyone for even one minute deny us the gift of life and the joy of life. Thank-you for reading this, I hope it will encourage someone else like me.

May 25th, 2013 2:44pm

People " Refuse to See" what is really going on with me!!! I have been trying to Open their eyes and hint to them to make them see that their is something wrong with my brain! I don't know how many time I have hinted to people that the signs are in front of their nose!!! I know that they see 1. neurological damage!! 2. Aggressive Behaviors when angry!! example: kicking doors, my breaking personal and throwing things 3. difficulty seeing things through someone eyes!!! 4. Frustration!!! 5. Cognitive abilities reasonably provoking anger !!!! 6. Intense mood swings or extreme reactions to everyday situations, overreaction, angry outbursts !!!!!! but people don't get the hint! things people should not do to me and cause is: 1. Do not criticize me! 2. Do not play and Make fun, judge of my impaired situation or life! 3. people should not attack me with words, physical harm or mental harm, they can cause someone like myself to commit suicide of severe mental stress!!!!

Apr 15th, 2013 12:45pm

My name is Greg. I have a brain injury. My injury came from teenage stupidity. I did nothing more than party for a few weeks, with out much sleep. Then decided to go swimming, not a good idea. Rehab was long and hard but if you stick with it will feel as if there is nothing wrong. Unfortunately, there is no cure, but if you work your ass off you will be surprised. The more one uses the brain the better it will work. This is only the condensed version of this story. I don't have a lot of room to expand.

Mar 10th, 2013 9:44pm

Traumatic Head Injury – Coma for two week’s yet questioned in the dock by a High Court Judge...In Ireland, disabled people do not hold legal rights! Seeking help and advice, I wrote a letter to Oprah Winfrey.

Jan 12th, 2013 12:56pm

keep the faith GOD will work it out.Been there in the hospital for 5 month,but GOD did it with help with wife,family,freinds,dont gave up i known its seem hard but with faith you will win

Dec 27th, 2012 3:12pm

My name is Robert , I have TBI,I am so frustrated I feel as if something was knocked out of me. God help me recover!

Dec 6th, 2012 11:26pm

I dont really understand as to why more hasn't been done. this issue is affecting millions of people all over the world and it seems unfair to keep these people from being healthy. as a professional athlete i feel that this issue neds resolved, and soon

Dec 6th, 2012 3:12pm

Hello everyone, I just wanted to say I hope while reading this that yourself or a loved one is staying strong through such a difficult and traumatic experience. You hear of so many inspiring stories and many that are heart breaking. Stay strong!! I am writing to let everyone know that there are people out there who care about you and your circumstances and are doing everything in their power to help raise awareness and money to help those with traumatic brain injuries. I myself, as well as 3 other Temple University students, am involved in raising both money and awareness to The BIAPA (Brain Injury Association of Pennsylvania) We have done small things such as volunteer our time to helping BIAPA sponsored events, raise money for a program called “Helping with Helmets”, which is a program aimed towards preventing brain injuries, and raise money for the BIAPA itself. Not only has this been a rewarding experience but my goal is to let you know that wherever you are reading this there is a Brain injury association near/around you that wants to help and is willing to help. I encourage you to reach out and join in discussions and share experiences with others. Be willing to help and volunteer time, money or just be proactive in preventing brain injuries and helping those who need support. We as a group started http://www.firstgiving.com/fundraiser/helpingwithhelmets/biapa this link is a link that is meant for anyone and everyone to donate whatever they can to the BIAPA. You could also donate to the brain injury association near you as well. If you cannot donate please be proactive in preventing brain injuries. The littlest things like putting a helmet on a child while riding a bike are small steps that reduce big problems. I thank you for your time and generosity. Before I leave this discussion please know that our prayers and thoughts are always with you. Stay strong and believe we can make a difference.

Nov 15th, 2012 11:12pm

Great Information. i look forward to reading more. thanks, http://lawyerschwartz.com/practice-areas/personal-injury

Nov 7th, 2012 12:18am

I don't know if this is a place to post this, but when I was between the ages of 6 and 9 I suffered a concussion. Now being 31, I am wondering if there may be lasting brain injuries that I sustained. I suffer occasional head and neck stiffness, frequent light to moderate headaches and random mood changes that aren't "me". I'm wondering where I could read up on this possibility or find other information that may help in this. Thank you.

Aug 19th, 2012 10:13pm

My name is Kate and on Jan. 9 of 2012 when I was 61 and a half years old I was innocently and correctly crossing the street when I was hit by a car. The result was a pretty severe head injury which resulted in brain swelling and a near-death experience of which I remember nothing. Three weeks later I came to myself when I arrived at one of Pittsburgh's premier rehab hospitals. Six months later I feel I am about 97% back and very thankful that I am here and that I didn't suffer any other kinds of physical injuries. However I have found that surviving a brain injury has left me a different person. There are small things that just aren't the same as they were. Fortunately for me it has not caused an undue change in my day-to-day functioning, ability to work, drive a car, shop, etc. It is very hard to put into words but something is different about me and I am trying to make it a positive change.

Aug 4th, 2012 11:45am

My name is Katie, I slipped and fell on the ice 2 years ago and have been to every doctor it seems and know one knows why I'm having the problems Im having. I have terrible head aches, slowness in processing, anger issues, I'm tired all the time, My head feels heavy, I have vertigo, I've broken my ankle, little finger because of falling allot, I still throw up alot, I have terrible back pain and I'm at my witts end because the MRI's, CAT, & EEG's are all normal. I don't know what to do anymore. They don't even have councilors that understand brain injury's,,, I just feel like jumping off a bridge,,, Is there any Doctor out there that can help?

Apr 11th, 2012 1:23am

Message From Debbie What I do Know about MTBI Now that I am a moderate to severe brain injured person I want to tell you the things I would have done different the 7 years I had a mild traumatic brain injury. 1. I would NOT have tried so hard to be the "old me" 2. I would NOT have been so hard on myself. I was my own worst enemy 3. I would NOT have put more pressure on myself than I deserved 4. I would NOT have spent any time crying over the things I had a hard time doing 5. I would NOT have stayed so frustrated or intimidated by the things that were more difficult for me to do 6. I would NOT have thought there was anything MILD about it, it was very, very difficult!

Jan 24th, 2012 1:40pm

My Dearest Soldier My dearest soldier, I remember when you would have died for me, Why then oh why, is suicide the only option you can now see? I sit here alone and wish I knew how to call you up on the phone. I wish I knew who or where you were so I could make sure you aren't alone. I wish you would send me your email so I could just drop you a line, The real truth is, I want some guarantee that you will eventually be just fine. But wars hurt and mame and the warriors never come home quite the same. You all have paid such an ultimate price and life in this world can get insane. If I could scream at you I would say just wait a little longer until you want to again live. But I know that with PTSD, brain trauma, wheelchair’s, and all the rest, your feeling you must have nothing else to give. But if you will take just a moment to listen to a friend, I promise with time the heart can again mend. If you listen close I’ll tell you the truth, even with a battered body or mind, you still have something special you can give a friend. Make sure someone gets you some access to a phone and a computer, Because I am excited to see what you can all do if You choose to live until the future. There will be hope again in your life, I Promise! With Loving Regards, Debbie Wilson 12-26-2011

Dec 27th, 2011 6:03pm

i got into a bad car accident sept. 24, 1996, midnight i was 18, i have no memorie of who i was, and am not sure of who i am, but i know of the daily struggles, and also know that at times we need to just stop and look at all the beauty around us, what we almost missed,d alot of lifes situations confusing, but it makes me want to fight and move forward

Dec 18th, 2011 7:26pm

In August of 1967 my Dad, Mom, brother and myself were injured in an automobile accident. My Mom and I sustained life threatening injuries and neither of us were expected to live through the night. I sustained an open skull fracture and a fractured left femur. I remained in a coma for 3 weeks. When I awoke from my coma, I remember thinking that I had just woke up from a bad dream. On February 6, 2007 I created Second Chance to Live http://secondchancetolive.wordpress.com/ at the encouragement of a friend. Since February 6, 2007, I have written and published a total of 820 articles for Second Chance to Live. On July 29, 2011 I created a You Tube Channel to share my articles in a different format. To date I have created 25 video presentations for the Second Chance to Live — 2dog bull channel. To see a list of my You Tube video presentations, please click on the following link: http://wp.me/P3atD-3B3 As you read my articles and watch my You Tube video presentations, and you have questions, please do not hesitate to ask those questions. All questions are good questions. To contact me, click on the following link: http://wp.me/P3atD-2M. I look forward to hearing from you. Craig

Nov 27th, 2011 3:05pm

Hi, my name is Greg,in 1986 i was shot in the head with a .45.I lived.Temporal lobe is mosly gone ,{left}.It mellowed me.somewhat.I have had seizures since about a month or so after the surgery.Dr.Mark Melgard saved my life.I did my part too. Bigger problem is blood clots,dvt,or whatever so I take blood thinner too. Anyway the seizures seem to be triggered from stress,so I stay away from people a lot.Lucky to live at a nice spot off a back country biway in oregon.

Nov 4th, 2011 11:30pm

In 1998 my life took a huge change of direction in the form of a severe traumatic brain injury. Like everyone else with a chronic permanent condition, I was told I would never recover. Everyone has a story and that's where most stop. Very few make a full recovery so it's deemed impossible by the world. The great news is that any challenge in life can be overcome. There are multiple steps, the first three are most important. Step 1 is to consider recovery and good health as a possibility. One must develop the ability to maintain that belief no matter what happens. Step 2 is to retire every dramatic detail surrounding the challenge. Step 3 is to neutralize emotional triggers in your life. Your friends and family will tend to side with the doctors acknowledging every little thing as a sign that you are ill rather than evidence that you are on your way. I speak from experience, as one who has fully recovered from a permanently chronic disability, without support it can be very lonely. The most difficult part is maintaining focus that the disability is merely a challenge you can surmount. It does no good to claim it as your own (saying "My injury" for example), to do so only hinders one's ability to recover immensely. If you do not allow the challenge to define you the effects can subside and leave completely. Only one person in my life empowered my recovery but he didn't know how else to help. I was basically on my own and it took me roughly a decade to recover completely. No support system which empowered recovery seemed like a problem that had to be overcome if I was to see any change in the world. My first step in helping others recover was to start a conversation which empowered health rather than supported defeat. To reach my goal I created http://www.ConsideringHealth.org as a support system for anyone wanting to recover. I believe you can do it and I will empower you all the way. Please check out the blog, refer others and ask me questions. I want to build it big and teach the world, "Although debilitating challenges can be terrible, full recovery isn't."

Sep 14th, 2011 7:54pm

My son suffered a TBI in 2007 he also was 3 on the glasgow scale,2 months after the accident he got MRSA in his brain so now his left brain is mostly gone. This has changed both our lifes he is a grown man of 30 yet emoitionally he's only 10-12 yrs old for me I've chosen to dedicate my life to caring for him while working full time. My biggest frusttration is there are no coginative services available for him no daycare he can go to. When he was released from hospital after 3 months he got 3 weeks of inpatient rehab and 30 visits with out patient. This is so hard to know he has so much potiential if only he could get access to services or if he had insurance or I made much much more money. I read all the time about people who've suffered a TBI and gone on to do good things with their lifes I just wish I could give my son a better shot at it. Oh, he wasn't suppose to survive the accident or walk or talk but he did, he can walk and he has a limited vocabulary. Thanks for letting me vent.

Sep 9th, 2011 12:14pm

BrainSong, The Micah Jones Foundation was founded by Micah Jones as a result of a traumatic brain injury (TBI) she suffered in 2004 in Nashville. Micah was ready to graduate from MTSU and had just started an internship with a Music Row company the evening of the accident. Micah was crossing the street to get a taxi and was hit by a car. The driver and passenger of the car were off-duty police officers who were intoxicated twice the legal limit. Micah survived and while the road to recovery has been long and difficult she recognized the need for an organization for women with traumatic brain injuries; thus the founding of BrainSong. She is living a life with new lyrics. BrainSong will CONNECT women with traumatic brain injuries to share support, experience, knowledge and hope. BrainSong will also SERVE as an inspirational, informational resource center for women with TBIs through the BrainSong online community and annual conference. As a show of support, please click "Like" on the BrainSong Facebook page. You can also visit the web site at www.BrainSong.org for more information.

Sep 6th, 2011 2:33pm

Hi! My name is Melanie Leatherman> On October 30,2010 I was in a vehicle accident that totally changed my life. I use to be a very successful hair dresser and loved what I did but life changed in a blink of an eye. Well I must tell you that I have 2 children from a previous marriage, Hunter who is now 17 and Holly who is 10 and I am married to a wonderful man who was by my side during the entire recovery.. I don't remember what happened but what I was told was I was in the truck with a friend and he swerved and ran off the road, flipped and I flew out. I died at the scene and was brought back to life. I was air lifted from the local hospital to ETMC in Tyler Texas where I was in a coma for 54 days. One the night of the accident I was rated a 3 on the Glasgow scale which is lowest on the coma scale and spent 34 days listed as 3 three only responding to localized pain. I then was moved to TIRR in Houston where I rehabilitated a little over 40 days. I am super lucky to be where I am today! I am getting better by the month and will soon drive again. The Dr said I would probably be a vegetable. What I am on here for is to see if anyone else has been thru this and how they are now? This is my first trip to this site and am really interested too know about others . Thanks!! Melanie

Aug 18th, 2011 2:44pm

I had a motor cycle accident in 1975 causing a TBI with a pocket of blood on my brain resulting. Today I still have a pretty nasty Central Sleep Apena. My AHI was 92 i am told. I sleep with a pretty nice breathing machine that I have had to get used to. (thank god for insurance) Could have been a lot worse.

Aug 15th, 2011 2:27am


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