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The Loneliest Season

The Loneliest Season

"The truth is I was so lonely I was worried I was going crazy. At night, I would close my eyes and silently speak to the husband who no longer existed," writes caregiver Abby Maslin.

Who to Trust?

Who to Trust?

Of all the things I was warned about following TC’s brain injury diagnosis, no one suggested the idea of mistrust or suspicion. I didn’t anticipate waking up one day, twelve exhausting and painstaking months into his recovery, to find myself on trial, accused of harboring ulterior motives and secret plans...

"I'm Really Not Rude or Self-Absorbed; It's the Brain Injury"

"I'm Really Not Rude or Self-Absorbed; It's the Brain Injury"

Adam knows from his experiences as well as those of most of his friends with TBI that social situations can be difficult. Sometimes they know they can come off as "rude or self-absorbed" but that way of being, or seeming, is more a function of cognitive dysfunction.

There Is Nothing Lazy About Someone with a Brain Injury

There Is Nothing Lazy About Someone with a Brain Injury

Adam shares an email from a Marine's wife about "brain fatigue." She worries that people — including her injured husband — think he is lazy or less proactive when it's simply a physiological symptom of the TBI. Adam offers kind and sage advice.

The Vicious Cycle of High Emotions After a Brain Injury

The Vicious Cycle of High Emotions After a Brain Injury

For some service members and veterans like Adam, returning from a depolyment can feel like riding an emotional rollercoaster. He recommends trying to recognize these emotions, to become more self-aware as a way to break the vicious cycle of intense emotions and frustration.

Quick to Anger? Easily Frustrated? Reach Out for Help.

Quick to Anger Easily Frustrated Reach Out for Help

It's understandable that service members and veterans can get angry or frustrated when witnessing people in the civilian world getting upset about something trivial like a coffee made wrong. Adam shares some ideas.

Talking Frankly About Suicide

Talking Frankly About Suicide

Suicide is invariably tricky to discuss. Adam talks about what signs and symptoms people should be aware of for themselves and for their loved ones who are depressed and also what resources are out there to help.

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