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Concussion / Mild TBI

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A concussion is a blow or jolt to the head that can change the way your brain normally works. Also called a mild traumatic brain injury, a concussion can result from a car crash, a sports injury, or from a seemingly innocuous fall. Concussion recovery times can vary greatly. Most people who sustain a concussion or mild TBI are back to normal by three months or sooner. But others have long-term problems remembering things and concentration. Accidents can be so minor that neither doctor nor patient makes the connection.

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16 Things About Concussion Parents Need to Know
By: The Center on Brain Injury Research & Training, University of Oregon | May 9, 2014
Know what to do if your child sustains a concussion on the football field, basketball court, skateboarding, or just goofing around.

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Briana Scurry's Letter to Young Soccer Players
By: Briana Scurry | Personal Stories | February 25, 2014
Soccer great Briana Scurry writes an open letter to young athletes about her love for soccer and the importance of taking concussions seriously.

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What “Friday Night Tykes” Can Teach Us About Youth Football
By: Elizabeth Eckhart | January 29, 2014
Why do some parents and coaches think it's okay to let 9-year-old kids get hit in the head over and over in football practices and games?

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Parents and Youth Coaches Taking Charge of the Youth Concussion Issue
By: Gerard A. Gioia, PhD | January 27, 2014
As a parent, it's hard not to be worried and to question your child’s involvement in sports, especially contact sports, but sports come with great life lessons, too.

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Concussion: Frequently Asked Questions from Parents
By: The Center on Brain Injury Research and Training, University of Oregon | August 27, 2013
It's scary for parents after their child has a concussion. Having answers helps with that fear.

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Heads Up: Preventing Concussion
By: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | May 20, 2013
Learn how to prevent a concussion and, if one does occur, what symptoms to look for before calling your doctor.

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Ahead of the Game
By: Rosemarie Scolaro Moser, PhD | December 6, 2012
Learn more about the good and bad news about identifying and treating youth concussions.

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Infographic: TBI in Kids and Teens Can Impact School Performance
By: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association | October 11, 2012
Did you know that US emergency departments treat more than 170,000 sports- and recreation-related TBIs, including concussions, in children and teens, each year? Learn from and share this important infographic.

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A Portable Device to Detect TBI on the Sidelines
October 4, 2012
Learn about a new low-cost, portable device to detect possible neurocognitive symptoms after a TBI.

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No Need to Subject Kids to Repetitive Brain Trauma in Sports
September 20, 2012
Until contact sports are safer, Chris Nowinski would hold off as long as possible before letting his future children play games where repetitive brain trauma is commonplace.

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More Findings About Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy
September 20, 2012
There are limits to how many times a ball player can throw a ball before damaging his shoulder, but there are no limits to how many times an athlete can get hit in the head without permanent damage.

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Christopher Nowinski on the Nuances of Brain Injury in Children
September 20, 2012
Research shows that TBI in children is far worse than in adults — with longer recovery time and greater future risk. New rules and awareness are helping but there's more work to be done.

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Just a Few Knocks on the Head: The Concussion Conundrum
By: Jenni Ogden, PhD | July 31, 2012
This is a tale of two boys from very different backgrounds who had one very important thing in common. They were both mad about rugby — and they both suffered from concussion.

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Being Strict with Return-to-Play Guidelines
By: BrainLine | April 16, 2012
An athlete should never be returned to play after a concussion until all symptoms have been resolved and he or she has been cleared by a licensed provider.

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High Index of Concussion Suspicion Needed on the Sidelines
By: BrainLine | April 16, 2012
Concussions can be subtle and often invisible. That's why coaches, parents, and teammates need to have a high index of suspicion.

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Dr. Julian Bailes: Should We Be Worried About Subconcussive Blows in Sports?
By: BrainLine | April 16, 2012
More research is needed to determine if subconcussive blows — repetitive hits to the head not diagnosed or suspected as concussions — are deleterious.

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Tracy's Story: The End of an Athlete's Career
By: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Personal Stories | October 24, 2011
"If you think you have a concussion, don't hide it, report it ... I didn't know it could get this bad."

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REAP the Benefits of Good Concussion Management
By: Karen McAvoy, PsyD | June 3, 2011
A guide for every family, school, and medical professional to create a community-based concussion management program.

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Return to Play Guidelines
By: BrainLine.org | October 20, 2010
An athlete should not return to play until all of his symptoms — physical and cognitive — have cleared up.

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What Does Post-Concussive Syndrome Look Like in Children?
By: Dr. Jane Gillett | Ask the Expert | September 1, 2010
Learn what to look for in babies, young children, and adolescents.

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The Emotional Consequences of Concussion
By: Brainline | July 29, 2010
Lots of rest, sleep, and reduced stress are crucial for a child recovering from a mild TBI.

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Reentry to School After a Concussion or Closed Brain Injury
By: The Teaching Research Institute-Eugene | July 1, 2010
Students returning to school after a TBI need formal and consistent tracking.

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Does the Label “Concussion” Change Treatment?
By: BrainLine | Research Update | June 1, 2010
Kids who are diagnosed with a “concussion” might not be getting the care they need.

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How Can Parents Help Educate Their Children’s Coaches About Concussion?
By: Janet Brown | Ask the Expert | June 1, 2010
Don’t worry about seeming like an overprotective mom or dad … share your knowledge and keep your child safe on and off the field.

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Heads Up to Schools: Know Your ABCs — for Teachers, Counselors, and School Professionals
By: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | January 1, 2010
Learn your Concussion ABCs.

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Heads Up to Schools: Know Your ABCs — for School Nurses
By: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | January 1, 2010
For school nurses, know your Concussion ABCs.

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When Is It Safe to Return to Play After a Concussion?
By: Victoria Tilney McDonough | July 1, 2009
An important new law evens the playing field.

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Dr. James Kelly Talks About Children, Helmets, and Concussion
November 13, 2008
BrainLine sat down with Dr. Kelly to talk about how TBI affects children differently from adults, the use and design of helmets, and how parents can best deal with concussion in their child.

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Acute Concussion Evaluation (ACE) Test
By: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | November 6, 2008
This screening tool can be used for the initial evaluation and diagnosis of people who have or may have had a concussion.

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Concussion and Sports: Know Your Game!
By: The Teaching Research Institute-Eugene | August 1, 2008
Concussions are like snowflakes — not one is exactly like another.

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Concussions
By: The Children's Medical Center of Dayton | April 1, 2008
Is the risk of sustaining a TBI greater for kids?

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Concussion Recovery: Parents Play Important Role
By: Lindsay Barton | August 1, 2007
Key steps for families to take.

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Head Games
By: Christopher Nowinski | Personal Stories | January 1, 2007
America's favorite sport — football — has a serious problem.

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Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports
By: By the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2007) | January 1, 2007
This toolkit teaches coaches, athletes, and parents how to play it safe.

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Atención: Concusión cerebral en los deportes de la escuela secundaria (hoja informativa para los atletas)
By: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Spanish | February 1, 2005
La conmoción cerebral puede ocurrir sin que la persona pierda el conocimiento.  Esta hoja informativa ofrece información a los atletas sobre prevención, reconocimiento y reacción frente a una conmoción.

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Atención con las conmociones cerebrales en las escuelas: Hoja informativa para los padres
By: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Spanish | February 1, 2005
¿Qué es una conmoción cerebral y cuáles son los signos observados por los padres o tutores?


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