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Approximately 80K Students to have Concussion Insurance
WSAW-TV / April 27, 2017

Staring in August, about 80,000 Wisconsin student athletes will have concussion insurance. The insurance policy will act as a secondary insurance for students so families don't have to worry about out-of -pocket costs. "Primary will pay their portion and this program is set up to pay for all the gaps. There is zeros deductible with this program, so if there is no primary insurance set in place this will drop down and become primary," said Scott Lunsford, Senior Vice President of K&K Insurance Company.

Dale Earnhardt Jr.'s biggest victory was raising concussion awareness
USA Today / April 27, 2017

For everything he accomplished on the race track, and there was plenty, nothing carried as much weight as what Dale Earnhardt Jr. did off of it. By being open and honest about his concussions and the impact they had not just on his racing career but his entire life, Earnhardt broadened the discussion about head trauma. Be it other athletes, his fans or people who just recognized his famous last name, there are countless others who are better because of his struggles.

More teen knowledge about concussion may not increase reporting
Reuters / April 27, 2017

High school athletes with access to a certified athletic trainer are more knowledgeable about concussions and their consequences, but that doesn’t make them more likely to report a concussion, a U.S. study finds.

Resources help Soldiers cope with brain injuries
Fort Hood Sentinel / April 27, 2017

Traumatic brain injuries are hard to diagnose and difficult to treat because of the disease’s symptom diversity that can include anything from depression and anxiety to balance and memory issues. “There are so many forms of comorbidity associated with TBI that it makes for a very complex case presentation,” said Dr. Scott Engle, director of Fort Hood’s Intrepid Spirit Center. Recent data confirms that National Intrepid Center of Excellence (NICoE) and its programs are making a difference in helping Soldiers manage depression and post-traumatic stress.

Lawsuit: Army Should Factor PTSD in Discharge Decisions
Military.com / April 27, 2017

A federal lawsuit alleges the U.S. Army has issued less-than-honorable discharges for potentially thousands of service members without adequately considering the effects of post-traumatic stress disorder and other mental health conditions. The plaintiffs, two Army veterans from Connecticut who fought in Iraq and Afghanistan, say in the lawsuit that they were wrongly denied honorable discharges. The lawsuit filed in Connecticut by Yale Law School Veterans Legal Services Clinic is seeking class-action status.

Brain’s ability to rewire after injury can lead to long-term strains
Medical News / April 26, 2017

Like air-traffic controllers scrambling to reconnect flights when a major hub goes down, the brain has a remarkable ability to rewire itself after suffering an injury. However, maintaining these new connections between brain regions can strain the brain's resources, which can lead to serious problems later, including Alzheimer's Disease, according to researchers.

Team Wendy to target blast waves and rotational injuries in next-gen military helmets
New Atlas / April 26, 2017

Born out of family tragedy, Team Wendy has transitioned from small ski-gear manufacturer to supplier for the Australian and American military. Their next generation of helmets is being designed to better counteract rotational injuries and blast waves.

The invisible causes of homelessness
The Irish Times / April 26, 2017

In the United Kingdom, about 50 per cent of homeless people have suffered a traumatic brain injury and the vast majority of these injuries occurred before they became homeless, according to a recent report in The Psychologist.

Is there a connection between PTSD and combat blast exposure?
PBS NewsHour / April 20, 2017

In part three of PBS NewsHour's series War on the Brain, special correspondent Soledad O’Brien reports on how talks to a neuropathologist who is studying the brains of people who suffered traumatic brain injuries and the possible connection to PTSD.

The NFL concussion protocol cannot save football
SB Nation / April 19, 2017

There is no consensus among players that faking the concussion protocol is as prolific as some suggest. The one thing most would seem to agree on is that there is motivation to try. The tests used to screen concussions are inexact and need to be interpreted by a qualified medical professional. There is financial incentive for players to try to skew that interpretation and team goals that can encourage lax oversight. In short: The NFL environment is ripe for players to try to fake.

Researchers move forward with biomarker test to uncover babies' brain injury
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette / April 18, 2017

At Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, researchers have created a blood test to detect bleeding in the brain that may have resulted from abusive head trauma — sometimes called shaken baby syndrome.

How many parents hold their kids back from sports due to concussion risk?
CBS News / April 18, 2017

A recent survey shows which sports parents think are safer, but they may be off base, say experts.

Study: Head impact-measuring devices limited in ability to predict, diagnose concussions
USA Today / April 12, 2017

In a new study conducted by members of both the NeuroTrauma Research Laboratory at the University of Michigan and the School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences at Virginia Tech, researchers studied available head-impact devices and their clinical utility. Among the conclusions were that “head-impact sensors have limited applications to concussion diagnosis but may provide sideline staff with estimates of athlete exposure and real-time data to monitor players.”

Out Of Bounds: NASCAR Driver Dale Earnhardt Jr. On Concussions
NPR / April 11, 2017

NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro talks to NASCAR's most popular driver, Dale Earnhardt Jr., about how concussions have changed the sport, and his driving.

For years, former CU and Broncos lineman Ryan Miller refused to tell his full story. Not anymore.
The Denver Post / April 10, 2017

Ryan Miller, who was diagnosed with post-concussion syndrome, pledged to donate his brain to chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) research. He doesn't know if he has CTE. There’s no way he can know yet. But he knows he has to talk about it -- finally.

Charlie Garner's post-football life ruled by fear as his brain fails him
Sporting News / April 9, 2017

It's lunchtime and Charlie Garner sits in a restaurant near his home, looking and sounding like a man on top of the world. But, all of the sudden, it becomes horribly obvious all is not right with Garner. He is in the middle of a sentence when his sandwich drops from his hands to his plate for no discernible reason. His hands also fall to the table and don't move. The person with Garner looks at him with no idea what has just happened or how to react.

Study provides missing link for sex-dependent effects of mild brain blast injury
Medical News / April 6, 2017

The brains of men and women are wired differently, and when it comes to traumatic brain injuries, women are more likely to develop subsequent neuropsychiatric disorders, like anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. Until now, it's been unclear why that is, but a new study by researchers at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences provides that missing link - a potentially disrupted pathway in the brain.

Caregivers For Veterans Dropped From VA Plan
NPR / April 5, 2017

There's a Department of Veterans Affairs program to pay family members to be caregivers for disabled veterans. But several caregivers say they're being dropped from the program with no explanation.

Do U.S. Troops Risk Brain Injury When They Fire Heavy Weapons?
NPR / April 5, 2017

Some modern shoulder-fired weapons produce blast waves powerful enough to rattle the brain. A $30 million study aims to help the military figure out how much blast exposure, over time, is too much.

Studying the brain's suspension system in traumatic brain injuries
Science Daily / April 5, 2017

Researchers know that the membranes separating the skull from the brain play a key role in absorbing shock and preventing damage caused during a head impact, but the details remain largely mysterious. New research from a team of engineers at Washington University in St. Louis takes a closer look at this "suspension system" and the insight it could provide to limit or perhaps prevent TBI.

A Microwave Helmet May Help Diagnose Brain Injury
Smithsonian / March 31, 2017

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden think that a helmet called the Strokefinder could quickly diagnose intracranial bleeding.


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