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For Teens, the Benefits of Vocational Rehabilitation Before Leaving High School For Teens, the Benefits of Vocational Rehabilitation Before Leaving High School

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[Dr. Juliet Haarbauer-Krupa] If you've had a traumatic brain injury, you are eligible for services through vocational rehabilitation. That varies from state to state. In our state—in Georgia—the vocational counselors are really overwhelmed by the number of people they have to see. One of the best models we've seen interacting teens with voc rehab is in a couple counties where they actually contract with voc rehab to bring the counselors to schools, and those voc counselors are involved in the child's transition plan. That's for teens who are in special education. Special education is really the way that teens are served after a brain injury once they leave medical care. They can get a transition plan. They can get access to vocational rehabilitation services before leaving high school. In the program I run in the summer, we have several teens who we connected to voc rehab in high school, and they are now helping them with college expenses. So it's a tremendous benefit to be in touch with your vocational rehab counselor, especially before you graduate.

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Dr. Juliet Haarbauer-Krupa talks about the advantages for adolescents with TBI to talk with their  vocational rehab counselors before leaving high school.

See more video clips with Dr. Haarbauer-Krupa.

Produced by Victoria Tilney McDonough, Justin Rhodes, and Lara Collins, BrainLine.


Juliet Haarbauer-Krupa, PhDJuliet Haarbauer-Krupa, PhD, Juliet Haarbauer-Krupa, PhD has 30 years of clinical experience in brain injury and has developed various pediatric rehabilitation programs. She is a researcher/speech pathologist at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta and adjunct faculty, Department of Pediatrics, Emory School of Medicine.


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